Develop a Mind for Innovation: Is Your Behavioral Health Agency Driven by Data?

By July 1, 2020
Does your data drive innovation?

“Crises, especially the one we are experiencing now, have a significant financial and human toll, stranding assets and human capital and causing significant social and economic dislocation. However, many of these dynamics are ingredients for disruption from which new business models emerge.” – Innovation in a Crisis: Why it is more critical than ever, McKinsey & Company

Many of us read this quote and understand what is being communicated explicitly. There isn’t much to argue in the above statement. But how do these words translate into a reality where data can truly drive innovation for behavioral health providers? Have you considered all that has taken place with COVID-19 and the effects on our industry as innovative ingredients to create a new or revised agency model? A model that can sustain future crises? If not, it is likely due to one of two reasons:

  1. You are currently still operating your agency from a state of crisis due to the effects of COVID-19. You are simply trying to keep your agency afloat, devoting each resource to essential needs of today.
  2. You are uncertain of the first steps to take in becoming an innovative agency. This has impacted your ability to create an adapted and thriving business model.

Then what is the first step in becoming innovative? Without data, innovation will be misplaced and misguided. Efforts, resources, and changes will be applied to unaffected areas of the business. More than ever, right now is the time to look at data. Not tomorrow. Not in a few months. But right now. Because tomorrow may be too late. That over-worked service provider may decide she will submit her two-week notice tomorrow. All of which could be prevented by analyzing billed amount and units by clinician today to reveal potential burnout. To ultimately lead you to ask the right question and reveal the burnout you believe is taking place (likely as a result of overproduction due to COVID-19). Today you could speak to that service provider to create a plan for her sustainability and engagement, and prevent the two-week notice from being submitted in the first place.

So if data is the first step to becoming an innovative agency, what is keeping you from analyzing and utilizing it? Again, two major components are at play here:

  1. You don’t have the proper tools to analyze your data.
  2. You don’t know how to analyze the data. You are unsure of what data to look at and what the data tells you about your current state of business and future decision-making opportunities.

Having the tools to make decisions just as fast as our current environment is changing, is essential. In this upcoming blog series, we will explore the tools needed and points of data to analyze within three major aspects of your agency’s operations:

  1. Behavioral Health Staff Productivity and Utilization: Is overproduction a good thing?
  2. No-Show Rates in Behavioral Health: Can you explain your agency’s no-show rates?
  3. Service Types: Has your response to increased demand in Behavioral Health services actually lost your agency money?

Join us as we take a deep dive into each one over the coming weeks to understand how data can drive innovation in the behavioral health and I/DD fields.

 

For the entire article of ‘Innovation in a Crisis: Why it is more critical than ever’, click here